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Invited Talks

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These talks are given by invited speakers at LIPhy. The intended audience is the whole LIPhy. A large general introduction intended for non-specialist is usually provided.

Typical talk duration is around one hour and includes about 15 mn of questions. The talks are scheduled usually every monday at 2PM. The place is at the conference room, second floor. Access to the lab can be obtained through the secretaries.

Agenda

  • Monday 16 January 14:00-15:30 - Yuan-Nan YOUNG - New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA

    Dynamics of a Lipid Bilayer Membrane Immersed in a Viscous Fluid

    Résumé : Lipid bilayer membranes are essential components in cellular biology as they make up essential cellular components such as cytoplasmic membranes, mitochondria, reticulum, and cargo vesicles. In this talk we present results from both continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Dynamics of membrane deformation can be captured by both approaches, and yet the dynamics of membrane fusion remains a great challenge. In this talk we will present some recent results and progress in this direction. These results are from collaborations with Szu-Pei Fu (NJIT), Zhangli Peng (Notre Dame University), On Shun Pak (Santa Clara Univeristy), Shravan Veerapaneni (University of Michigan) and Howard Stone (Princeton University). This work is supported by National Science Foundation.



    contact: Chaouqi Misbah

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 30 January 14:00-15:30 - Olivier DAUCHOT - Gulliver, ESPCI, Paris

    Active Matter: Model and Experiments

    Résumé : The ubiquity of collective motions observed at all scales in more or less complex situations ranging from the cooperative action of molecular motors to the behavior of large animal or human groups, has recently driven a surge of theoretical and numerical activity.
    Within physics, most progress was achieved by studying microscopic point-particles models and their continuous descriptions. Among the landmark results are the possibility of true long-range orientational order in two dimensions, the generic presence of strong, long-range density correlations and the spontaneous formation of segregated dense and highly ordered nonlinear structures.
    In the present talk I will explore several experimental systems including walking grains, rolling colloids, and swimming droplets. In such model systems, one can in principle control the interactions amongst the agents and therefore provide firm experimental grounds in view of theoretical developments. In particular we shall discuss (i) how and why collective motion emerge in a system of polar disks, for which no alignment is a priori imposed at the microscopic level; (ii) the case of the colloidal rollers where interactions are of hydrodynamics and electrostatic origins; (iii) the intriguing swimming of pure water droplet in oil.



    contact: Chaouqi Misbah

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 6 February 14:00-15:30 - Aurélie Hourlier-Fargette - Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert and Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris

    Instabilities at Soft Interfaces: From Elastocapillary Snap-through to Wetting Dynamics on Elastomers

    Résumé : contact: Philippe Marmottant

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 6 March 14:00-15:30 - Stéphanie Pitre-Champagnat - IR4, Orsay

    LIPHY Seminar

    Résumé :



    contact: Gwennou Coupier

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 13 March 14:00-15:30 - Philippe Coussot - laboratoire Navier, UMR 8205 CNRS, ENPC-ParisTech, IFSTTAR, Université Paris-Est à Champs- sur-Marne

    LIPHY Seminar

    Résumé :



    contact: Elise Lorenceau

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 20 March 14:00-15:30 - Olivier Baledent - Reims

    LIPHY Seminar

    Résumé :



    contact: Mourad Ismaïl

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 27 March 14:00-15:30 - Céline Labouesse - Stem Cell Institue, Cambridge

    LIPHY Seminar

    Résumé :



    contact: Pierre Recho

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


  • Monday 29 May 14:00-15:30 - Maria Consiglia Merola - Stanford University, USA

    Viscoelastic properties of corneal epithelial cells using the “Linear Cell Monolayer Rheometer”

    Résumé : Mechanical properties of cells are determined by complex intracellular structures. In other words, there is a strong connection between biological processes and cellular mechanical response to external stimuli. In fact, cells’ interactions with their living environment are affected by their own mechanical behavior during biological deformations. These interactions, notably adhesion, are crucial to understand the cells adaptation in presence of artificial material such as contact lenses or medical devices.
    During the last decades, different experimental techniques have been used to investigate cell mechanics. Among them, we can mention atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microrheology. While they present a great interest, these techniques are however limited since they can only probe a single cell. In order to overcome the challenges with the biological variation between individual cells, new technologies are thus necessary.
    In this work, we present measurements using a purpose made Linear Cell Monolayer Rheometer (LCMR) that can characterize averaged cell mechanics or averaged cell adhesion. The LCMR enables the investigation of biologically active layers: controlled amounts of live cells with or without artificial materials (e.g., contact lenses). It is used in this study to measure the mechanics of corneal epithelial cells in order to characterize how these cells mechanically deform to external stimuli.
    To simulate physiological conditions, cell mechanics is quantified in experiments in which cells are strained tangential to the cell monolayer. Time-dependent step-strain tests are used to determine the mechanical relaxation of the cell layers.
    The quantification of cell mechanics using the LCMR has the potential for multiple biomedical applications, including disease diagnosis and drug-efficacy screening.



    contact: Claude Verdier

    Lieu : LIPhy, conference room - 140 Avenue de la Physique 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères


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